Know your bottled water: the benefits of spring vs. mineral and purified

Water may be clear but there’s a lot more to it than meets the eye. Making the smartest choice for your body starts with knowing where the water you drink comes from, and the different health benefits it can offer. Let’s take a closer look at the most common kinds of bottled water: spring, mineral and purified.

  

Spring water: follow your true nature 

Spring water is the perfect example of nature following her true nature. Pure, clean and straight from the source, you won’t find better water anywhere. 

Where is spring water sourced? 

Spring water is the most common kind of bottled water. It comes directly from a protected underground source, where the water naturally surfaces on its own. It can be collected right there from the surface or drilled directly from its underground source. And it’s typically the cleanest natural water you can find—ready to drink with no processing needed. 

The benefits of bottling water straight at the source 

When spring water is collected in large quantities by a tanker truck and transported to a bottling facility, there’s a risk of contamination. The water then needs to be filtered and processed to make sure it’s safe to drink. A cleaner option is to bottle spring water directly at the source, which we do at Eska. The result? Pure, natural drinking water that doesn’t require any processing at all. 

Mineral water: a source of calcium

Mineral water may sound self-explanatory. But did you know it can provide us with minerals that our bodies can’t produce on their own, like calcium? And a lot of these minerals offer hidden benefits for our health. 

What exactly is mineral water made up of?

Mineral water is exactly as it sounds: water that contains minerals. Much like spring water, it comes directly from protected underground sources. And the minerals are produced organically by the water itself, rather than added later. Just a few of these natural minerals include magnesium, sodium and potassium. 

Breaking down the contents of mineral water 

All water, even tap water, contains certain minerals and compounds. TDS (total dissolved solids) is a measurement of the amount of materials such as  minerals, metals, and ions that have been dissolved in the water. Solids dissolved in water are measured in PPM, which stands for parts per million.  

To give you a better idea for comparison, spring water, like Eska water, typically contains  around 50 PPM of TDS, whereas mineral water typically contains at least 250 PPM of TDS. According to the Safe Drinking Water Foundation, the Canadian guideline for TDS in drinking water is less than 500 PPM. Mineral water can sometimes be problematic as it runs the risk of going over the recommended limitations. Make sure you always read the label on your mineral water bottle to be mindful of what you’re drinking. 

Purified water: it’s a process 

Unlike spring and mineral water, purified water doesn’t necessarily come from a natural source. The name purified simply means the water has been filtered or processed to remove impurities like chemicals and other contaminants. 

How is the water purified? 

Purified water is water that’s been treated with one or several processes to remove dissolved solids, chemicals or contaminants. On the plus side, this process removes potentially harmful chemicals. On the flip side, it generally removes beneficial minerals, too.  

The different methods of water purification

Some of the most common processes used to purify water include: 

Filtration. The water is filtered through tiny membranes to remove germs and inorganic solids.

Distillation. The water is vaporized to kill microbes and remove natural minerals.

Reverse osmosis. The water is forced through membranes using high pressure to filter out chemicals and minerals.

Ozonation. Ozone gas is added to the water to disinfect it and kill microbes.

UV-light treatment. The water is passed through an intense UV light to eliminate microorganisms and viruses. 

What to look out for on bottled water labels 

Water companies have a responsibility to be transparent and tell customers exactly what’s inside their water. Want to be sure? Check out the helpful guide from the Canadian government, which lists exactly what should be written on water bottle labels. The top three things to look out for? Sodium content, whether there are any additives and where the water was sourced from. Reading the labels carefully can help you make an informed decision so you can choose your bottled water wisely. 

It’s important to understand what’s inside the water you drink every day to make the healthiest choices. Whether you’re power-walking in the park or working up a sweat in your Pilates class, make sure you stay hydrated and follow your true nature.

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