True or false? Test your knowledge of bottled water

Have you ever wondered if bottled water has an expiration date, or if organic water is a real thing? Test your knowledge of bottled water with these 5 true or false questions. 

True or false: Bottled water doesn’t have a taste.

False. If you prefer the taste of one bottled water over another, it’s not just in your head! Water gets its taste from the minerals it picks up as it flows through soil, rocks, rivers and pipes, so different waters have different flavours. 

Water sourced from pure mountain springs can contain minerals like magnesium that give the water a bitter taste, or sodium that can make it salty. Even water sourced from faraway icebergs, glaciers or volcanoes has minerals and electrolytes that can give it a distinctive flavour. And while these minerals aren’t bad for you, you might prefer one taste over another.

Eska water is naturally low in minerals, containing just 85 parts per million (ppm), which gives it an exceptionally clean and pure taste. The esker’s natural filtration system delivers clear and pristine water every time without the need for additional processing.

True or false: Bottled water has an expiration date.

True. Most bottled waters have an expiration date stamped on them, which is usually around two years after the bottling date. But the good news, according to Consumer Reports, is that bottled water can be safely consumed after the expiration date as long as it’s been stored properly. To extend the shelf life of your bottled water, make sure to store it in a cool, dark place.

True or false: Bottled water is treated. 

True… except for Eska. Some bottled waters are disinfected with ozone or specially filtered to remove particles and contaminants. The good thing about ozonation is that it prevents contamination inside the water and bottle. The downside is that if the water contains a certain level of bromide (which occurs naturally in water), there’s a chance the bromide will get oxidized and become bromate—a registered carcinogen in high doses. You can read more about it in our blog post  The purity of the Eska bottling process by our Chief Operating Officer and Vice President of Operations, Michel McArthur.

Eska water doesn’t require any treatment. We make sure every drop remains untouched because it’s perfect the way it is, just as nature intended.  

True or false: Bottled water contains additives (a.k.a. enhancements).

True… but again, Eska is the exception. After purifying their water, some bottled water companies add minerals such as magnesium, potassium, calcium and salt to make it more palatable for consumers.

But Eska water tastes so crisp and pure when it comes out of the esker source that we don’t need to add anything to it. Any minerals present in our water are naturally occuring.

True or false: There’s such a thing as organic water. 

False. Organic water is a marketing myth. Just like ‘gluten-free lemonade’ isn’t a thing (no lemonade contains gluten), water can’t be labelled organic since it doesn’t contain any carbon. Water contains two atoms of hydrogen and one atom of oxygen, so it’s always considered an inorganic substance. 
But while Eska water isn’t technically organic, it is naturally pure. So why settle for less when you can taste the very best of what nature has to offer?

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